19 de febrero de 2020
ÚLTIMAS NOTICIAS:
Hispanic World

Comb, trumpet, doll from Auschwitz on display at first LatAm Holocaust museum

By Concepcion M. Moreno

By Concepcion M. Moreno

Montevideo, Jan 26 (efe-epa).- Their names were Maria Klein, Pinkus Frank, Ide Taube and Alex Sofer, but the Third Reich knew them only as Israel or Sara, the standard designations for male and female Jews during the years when Adolf Hitler was in power.

All of them survived the Holocaust and came to Uruguay, where they began new lives and donated personal items to help create the first Holocaust memorial center in Latin America.

The unmistakable striped prison clothing of the concentration camp, a comb kept with the dream of looking as dignified as possible when freedom was regained, the trumpet of a music fanatic, a little girl's doll and even the surgical instrument of a Spanish veterinarian interned in Mauthausen are some of the personal items on display there.

The Holocaust Memorial Center, located in Kehila, the Uruguayan Jewish Community, in Montevideo, Uruguay, was founded in 1953 as the Association of Survivors of Naziism, which in 1965 opened the museum in a different location, although it moved to its present site in 1988.

The museum was reopened in November 2019 after more than two years of adaptation to new technologies and, as historian and lecturer Andres Serralta said, "changing the ... museum's story to take advantage of the stock (of items) and to have a space that would allow visitors to put everything into context."

The Simon Wiesenthal Library, named after the famed "Nazi hunter," who devoted much of his life to bringing fugitive war criminals to justice, is one of the jewels of the center, holding some 2,000 titles, including encyclopedias, essays and items related to the "Shoa," as the Holocaust is known in Hebrew, and to human rights in general.

Museum manager Silvina Cattaneo told EFE during a visit to the center to mark the 75th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camp that young people, foreign students, researchers and even theater groups come to the library looking for documents.

It's "specific material that they're not going to find elsewhere, and it's open to all members of the public and is free," the librarian said, adding that "it's a real pedagogical challenge" to explain the Holocaust to young people, but she insisted that it's fundamental not to allow the memory of what the Nazis did to fade.

"Educating a child makes a difference when later they have to welcome a refugee, when they have to deal with victims of war, with different (people)," she said, giving as an example the way Germany has treated Syrian refugees after having acknowledged "its mistakes" as a society during World War II.

"In the long term, education is the best investment, and Europe, with the Syrian crisis, was proof that it's not the same thing" forgetting and teaching about the past, she said.

Serralta said that the Show Museum is designed "to be able to transmit ... the importance of respect for human rights, civil liberties, to inculcate tolerance, respect for others and, above all, to try and foster empathy" to have "a more tolerant and more peaceful society."

"What we teach here ... is an opportunity to address how we fulfill our role as citizens and to what degree we participate in increasing the level of tolerance, the level of empathy with others as individuals" and also discovering if "we have certain attitudes that don't favor this change," he said.

Despite the fact that the museum's board of directors includes descendants of Holocaust survivors, including museum director Rita Vinocur, and one of the lecturers, Sandra Veinstein, neither Serralta nor Cattaneo are Jewish.

"I grew up in a family in which human rights were very much in the forefront, meaning respect for others. If atheists and Judeo-Christians have one thing in common it's the concept of fraternity. Other people are my brothers, they're just the same as me," Cattaneo said.

"At times in societies, it's very difficult to spot the moment of breakdown where freedoms are being lost little by little and there comes a moment where you can no longer do anything," she said.

However, she added that "often we tend to be very pessimistic regarding the number of instances where human rights have been lost, where there's been massive violence ... and we have to think that everything repeats itself and we haven't learned anything."

Allied forces liberated the Auschwitz camp, which is in southern Poland, on Jan. 27, 1945, and the 75th anniversary of that date is now being marked to pay tribute to the victims of the Holocaust.

While experts try to transfer "concepts of the Holocaust to current issues such as 'bullying,'" visitors to the museum can examine the timeline there, maps and photographs that give a more personal touch to the Holocaust, look over the personal items and learn about the stories of those who survived it, as well as the millions who died.

Contenido relacionado

Auschwitz survivors warn world not to forget the Holocaust

Auschwitz, Jan 26 (efe-epa).- Auschwitz survivors have returned to the concentration and death camp where they suffered the barbarity of Nazi Germany.

They have returned to attend commemorations for the 75th anniversary of their release and do so with an important message to the world: Do not forget what happened in the Holocaust and make sure it never happens again.

Lidia Turovskaya, a Polish-Russian survivor, said being able to tell of the horrors they lived through at the camp was their "legacy" to the world.

Anna Dabrowska, another of the Polish survivors, was arrested in 1942 for her support of the resistance. She was deported to Auschwitz, where she remained until she was transferred to another camp in January 1945, days before the arrival of the Soviet liberators.

Dabrowska told the media she would continue telling her story for as long as she could, vowing that she had an "obligation" to do so.

Together with other survivors who were also in Oswiecim on Sunday - and who will be at the events organized in Auschwitz on Monday - Dabrowska wanted her memories to raise awareness and prevent such atrocities ever being repeated.

Benjamin Lesser, another survivor, came over from the United States, having moved there after World War II.

He was in Poland to recount his experiences and participate in the commemorative events.

Lesser recalled how when he got off the train at the camp with his parents and siblings were taken off to the gas chamber - a fact he didn't know at the time.

He said accepting work on the camp at the age of 15 saved his life.

The official ceremony for the 75th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp begins at 2 pm GMT on Monday.

About 2,500 guests from 50 countries are set to attend.

About 200 survivors will participate in the commemorations, a spokesperson for the Auschwitz memorial museum Lukasz Lupinski told Efe.

For Lupinski, the survivors who are still alive and able to recount their stories are the most important protagonists at the events.

The Auschwitz-Birkenau museum was opened in 1947 in the former extermination camp, where between 1940-1945 more than one million people were killed - 90 percent of whom were Jews.

The camp was liberated by Soviet forces on 27 January 1945 - a date that the United Nations now recognizes as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. EFE-EPA

nt/sh

Histórico de noticias
Brazil's Carnival continues with marked feminist accent

Rio de Janeiro, Feb 16 (efe-epa).- Brazil's nationwide Carnival celebration continued on Sunday with a marked feminist accent emphasized by a band that drew...

Dominican municipal elections suspended due to technical problems

Santo Domingo, Feb 16 (EFE).- The Dominican Republic's Central Election Board (JCE) on Sunday suspended the nationwide municipal elections after multiple...

Trump kicks off Daytona 500 in Florida, but rain delays the race

Miami, Feb 16 (efe-epa)- President Donald Trump kicked off the Daytona 500 under initially sunny skies at the Daytona International Speedway in Florida on...

Samsung presents Galaxy Z Flip, first foldable smartphone

San Francisco, Feb 11 (efe-epa).- South Korean multinational Samsung on Tuesday presented its new foldable smartphone, the Galaxy Z Flip, this model with a...

U2's Bono, UN denounce educational disadvantage for girls around world

United Nations, Feb 11 (efe-epa).- Singer Bono and the United Nations on Tuesday denounced the "dramatic disadvantage" in education being suffered by female...

Guaido beaten by mob upon landing in Caracas

Caracas, Feb 11 (efe-epa).- Opposition leader Juan Guaido, recognized as Venezuela's legitimate interim president by more than 50 nations, on Tuesday was...

Fed's Powell warns of economic risks of coronavirus amid Trump's attacks

By Alfonso Fernandez

Final Iowa caucus recount gives Buttigieg delegate win

Washington, Feb 9 (efe-epa).- Almost a week after the Iowa caucuses, the Democratic Party announced Sunday that former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete...

Hundreds of wizards-for-a-day celebrate "Harry Potter" saga in Argentina

Buenos Aires, Feb 6 (efe-epa).- Hundreds of fans left their "muggle" (non-magical) life to one side on Thursday to attend "Harry Potter Book Night" in...

Weinstein defense calls its first witnesses

New York, Feb 6 (efe-epa).- The defense team of former Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, who is on trial in New York for rape, on Thursday called its...

Trump holds White House celebration to revel in Senate acquittal

Washington, Feb 6 (efe-epa).- President Donald Trump on Thursday organized a "celebration" at the White House to hail his acquittal in his impeachment trial...

Zona MACO art fair starts in Mexico with new plan to hike attendance

By Ines Amarelo

Trump acquitted in near party line Senate vote on impeachment charges

Washington, Feb 5 (efe-epa).- President Donald Trump was acquitted on Wednesday in a vote by the Republican-controlled Senate on the two impeachment charges...

US threatens Reliance, Repsol, Chevron, Rosneft with sanctions over Venezuela

Washington, Feb 5 (efe-epa).- The United States on Wednesday threatened to impose sanctions on US petroleum firm Chevron, Spain's Repsol and India's...

US trade deficit declines for 1st time in 6 years amid trade tensions

By Alfonso Fernandez

Almost 1,000 police murdered in Mexico in the past 2 years

Mexico City, Feb 4 (efe-epa).- From 2018 up through January 2020, at least 953 police officers were murdered in Mexico, a reflection of the wave of violence...

Puerto Rico's Adriana Diaz among world's top 20 in ping pong

San Juan, Feb 4 (efe-epa).- In a sport where Asians reign supreme, for the first time in her short yet successful table tennis career Puerto Rico's Adriana...

Trump to address split Congress, Senate on verge of acquitting him at trial

By Lucia Leal

Iowa, between Biden's moderation and Bernie's revolution

By Beatriz Pascual Macias

Alphabet beats on earnings per share, misses on revenue

San Francisco, Feb 3 (efe-epa).- Internet giant Alphabet, the parent company of Google, released yearly and quarterly results on Monday, showing net profits...

Newton, Iowa: Between the pain of de-industrialization and the elections

By Beatriz Pascual Macias

Groundhog Day celebrations take place in US

Washington, Feb 2 (efe-epa).- Punxsutawney Phil, the most famous weather-predicting animal in the world, emerged from his burrow in the same-named town in...

Amazon shares skyrocket after earnings beat

By Marc Arcas

Innovative pay methods to be showcased at Super Bowl

Miami, Jan 30 (efe-epa).- Multinational technology giant Visa will have more than 800 contactless payment points in the stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida,...