21 de noviembre de 2019
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Protests continue in Bolivia as uncertainty looms after Morales resigns

By Laura Nuneez Marín

By Laura Nuneez Marín

La Paz, Nov 10 (efe-epa).- Hundreds of people defied rain and freezing temperatures in La Paz on Sunday to gather for protests in different parts of the Bolivian capital as tense calm and looming uncertainty prevailed in the country after President Evo Morales resigned earlier in the day.

Singing an anti-Morales song which has been popular since the beginning of the protests, people of different ages marched through the city streets.

Anger, euphoria, and uncertainty

Bolivians woke up on Sunday with the news of the Organization of American States releasing a report recommending fresh elections, citing serious irregularities in the Oct. 20 polls, in which Morales had been declared a winner.

Soon the streets were filled with angry protesters demanding the resignation of Morales, which eventually came about in the afternoon as the president stepped down and announced fresh elections in a video.

The opposition's fury soon turned to celebrations, with the crowds waving flags and vehicle caravans honking together to celebrate the news. However, uncertainty had returned by the night.

The euphoria subsided as a series of developments showed that the country continued to be mired in political uncertainty.

Morales and his vice president, Alvaro Garcia Linera, announced they were resigning from their positions, reiterating their denunciations of a coup d'etat, but their letters of resignation have not been made public so far.

A majority of the pro-opposition protesters were aware of the ambivalent political status, remaining on the streets with a sense that “a battle had been won but the war continued”.

The opposition is not ready to trust Morales' exit until it sees a signed resignation letter submitted to the parliament.

"We don't have the letter, we haven't seen it. (...) What happened in Venezuela could be repeated here,” a young protester told EFE, referring to a failed attempt to oust Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, another left-wing leader seen as close to Morales.

“We are going to stay here until we have the surety: a signed paper saying Evo Morales is never going to return and is going to jail. We will continue no matter what it costs, even if we have to pay with blood,” the protester said.

“It was a joy, but it lasted little because this government was already prepared. It was not something sudden, their people are already escaping and the MAS (Movimiento al Socialismo, Morales' party) supporters have been ordered to confront (us). This is already violating rights, overtaking democracy," another man said.

Incidents and threats

Anti-Morales protesters maintained a vigil in the capital to prevent the supporters of the president and his party from the neighboring city of El Alto from "stirring trouble" and getting involved in clashes like the ones reported in the capital on Saturday.

Some streets away, a group stood guard on the road leading to the government headquarters, only allowing access to police officers, who have been key figures in the recent political turbulence of the country after sections of them rebelled against the government.

However, the uneasy calm seemed increasingly broken towards Sunday night as riots and clashed were reported from many places.

Agitating groups holding a civic strike demanding Morales' exit in the city of Potosi were allegedly attacked and threatened.

During the day, pro-government groups were targeted, but politicians, leaders, and journalists backing the opposition were reportedly attacked in the evening.

Looting and arson attacks were reported mainly in El Alto, one of the political strongholds of Morales, and several neighborhoods of La Paz.

A group damaged Morales' house in Cochabamba, according to local media.

An opposition supporter in the capital told EFE that firecrackers were thrown at a crowd celebrating the president's resignation.

A taxi driver plying the streets of La Paz said in his opinion the resignation of Morales was the best solution to the crisis, blaming the pro-government faction for the disturbances.

There was hardly any transport available in the city, with the streetcars having stopped at night, while businesses were closed and streets were buzzing with protesters amid puddles of water.

Monday promises to be an eventful day and the political scenario could be clearer in Bolivia, which has been plunged into a political and social crisis since the general elections amid allegations of fraud favoring the re-election of Morales for the fourth term until 2025. EFE-EPA

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Contenido relacionado

Riots set in across Bolivia after Morales resigns

La Paz, Nov 10 (efe-epa).- Riots extended on Sunday night to several cities in Bolivia after the resignation of Evo Morales as president of the country, with fires, looting and attacks on properties.

The incidents took place in La Paz, El Alto and Cochabamba, among other major cities in the country, while many citizens asked the police and Armed Forces for help through social networks.

Looting and arson attacks were reported mainly in El Alto, one of the political strongholds of Morales, and in several neighborhoods of La Paz.

The most attacked area of the city of Bolivian government headquarters was the southern zone, where in recent weeks citizens have lashed out against the re-election of Morales.

The Mayor's Office of La Paz reported that a mob burned 15 buses of the municipal transport service in Kupillani neighborhood.

It added that "drivers and people called to mobilize by deputies and leaders" of Morales' Movement for Socialism (MAS) entered a municipal transport yard in Huayllani, another southern neighborhood, and "(began) to set the buses on fire.”

"We denounce that groups organized by deputies and candidates of the MAS for the southern zone and El Alto are assaulting the stations of @LaPazBUS, of the La Portada Hospital and threatening the houses of the municipal authorities. We are presenting the respective criminal complaints," the mayor of La Paz and opposition ally Luis Revilla said on Twitter.

Residents of the southern zone of La Paz reported on social networks that violent groups went through the streets of several neighborhoods throwing rocks at houses and vehicles and looting shops, without police coming to their aid.

In El Alto, mobs ransacked a popular fair and set businesses on fire.

"In the face of the attack from organized violent groups, I again make a strong call to the Armed Forces and the National Police, so that they protect citizens and guarantee the unity and life of people, in compliance with their constitutional mandate," former president Carlos Mesa said on Twitter.

In Cochabamba, a group caused damage to Morales' house, according to local media.

Bolivia has been plunged into a political and social crisis since the general elections held on Oct. 20 amid allegations of fraud favoring the re-election of Morales for the fourth term until 2025.

Morales announced his resignation and new elections Sunday morning after more than two weeks of citizen protests against fraud and clashes between opponents and supporters, in addition to a police uprising in the last two days.

Earlier in the day, a report by the Organization of American States (OAS) warned of serious irregularities in the general elections.

Morales and his vice president, Alvaro Garcia Linera, announced in a video that they were resigning from their positions, reiterating their denunciations of a coup d'etat, but their letters of resignation have not been made public so far.

In the video, Morales considered that the OAS made a "political" decision. EFE-EPA

lar-gb/ht/tw

Latin American allies denounce 'coup' as Bolivia's Morales resigns

La Paz, Nov 10 (efe-epa).- The resignation of Evo Morales as president of Bolivia was described Sunday as "coup d'etat" by several Latin American governments and politicians linked to his mandate, while opposition parties and citizens celebrated in the streets.

Morales confirmed his resignation after almost 14 years in power in a video directed towards Bolivian citizens from an undetermined place and after several resignations in his government. He said he had decided to call new elections.

The country has faced a crisis since elections on Oct. 20, in which Morales was proclaimed winner and in which the opposition and other groups denounced fraud, leading to public clashes that left three people dead and about 400 injured.

ALLIES CONDEMN ‘COUP D’ETAT’

The president of Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro, was one of the first to categorically condemned a "coup d'etat" against Morales, his longtime regional ally.

He asked the "social and political movements of the world" to declare themselves "in mobilization to demand the preservation of the life of the Bolivian native people who are victims of racism.”

Along the same line, Cuban president Miguel Diaz-Canel said "the world must mobilize for the life and freedom of Evo," after expressing his "strong" condemnation of the "coup" on Twitter using the hashtags #EvoNoEstásSolo (#EvoYouAreNotAlone) and #SomosCuba (#WeAreCuba).

For Alberto Fernandez, the newly elected president of Argentina, this "institutional rupture in Bolivia is unacceptable," although he called on the people of the country to "choose as soon as possible, in free and informed elections, their next Government.”

In another tweet, he condemned the "violence that prevented Evo Morales from completing his presidential term and altered the course of the electoral process.”

The current government of Argentina, led by Mauricio Macri, said it had not received a request for political asylum from Morales as has been speculated.

Former Brazilian president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who was recently released from prison and lived in power with Morales, described as a "coup" the popular pressure that led to the resignation of his "fellow.”

"He was forced to resign. It is unfortunate that Latin America has an elite economy that does not know how to live with democracy and the social inclusion of the poorest," he said on Twitter.

Mexico’s Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard went further and warned that in Bolivia there is "an ongoing military operation" which the government of his country rejects while saying: "coup, no.”

He said that if Morales wants, he would be offered asylum at the Mexican embassy in the city of La Paz, where requests from 20 people of the Bolivian executive and legislature have already been received.

Mexican senator Yeidckol Polevnsky, leader of the National Regeneration Movement (Morena) of President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, described the situation as "a coup to democracy in Latin America" and "a return to violence.”

In a statement, the government of Nicaragua also condemned what it described as a “coup d’etat.”

OPPOSITION CELEBRATES

Among several gatherings of dozens of Bolivians who took to the streets to celebrate the departure of Morales, the former president of the country Carlos Mesa (2003-2005), one of the promoters of the demonstrations, celebrated the "end of tyranny.”

"To Bolivia, to its people, to young people, to women, to the heroism of peaceful resistance, I will never forget this special day. The end of tyranny. Grateful as a Bolivian for this historical lesson. Long live Bolivia!!!!!" Mesa wrote on Twitter.

The opposition civic leader Luis Fernando Camacho, another of the protesters, posted on Facebook that "the blockades are not lifted, not yet" and announced that he would go to his home Santa Cruz in the next hours to deliver a message.

Former minister Carlos Sanchez Berzain, exiled in the United States since 2003, urged in statements provided to EFE that his countrymen remain united during the "turning point" that was the resignation of the "dictator" and advocated a return to one republic.

Sanchez Berzain, who was defense minister when President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada resigned amid popular protests led precisely by Morales, congratulated the "encouraging" civic movement that managed to end the "Castrochavism project" in Bolivia.

CALL FOR CALM

The Colombian government asked the Organization of American States (OAS) on Sunday to convene an "urgent" meeting of its Permanent Council "in order to find solutions to the complex institutional situation" in Bolivia.

Peru also said that it should "vote" so that the transition takes place in "the framework of the law” so that "peaceful coexistence" will be restored.

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro claimed that the resignation of Morales was "the fraud allegations" and added that it left a "lesson" that the votes "must be audited,” although both Morales and Bolsonaro maintain a good relationship because of the bilateral commercial relationship for Bolivian gas.

In statements to newspaper O Globo, Bolsonaro also rejected that the events that led to the resignation of Morales are considered a "coup" since that word "is used a lot when the left loses" but not when they win. EFE-EPA

arm/ht/tw

Bolivia's Evo Morales resigns presidency after almost 14 years in power

La Paz, Nov 10 (efe-epa).- Bowing to widespread pressure to resign, Bolivia's Evo Morales confirmed Sunday afternoon that he is stepping down as president after almost 14 years in power in a video made public from an unknown location.

The move comes after many other top government officials had resigned.

Vice President Alvaro Garcia Linera also resigned after Morales stepped down.

The two men appeared together in a video in which they issued a call for calm and peace in Bolivia.

In the video, Morales lamented what he said was a "civic coup" against him and called on opposition leaders Carlos Mesa and Luis Fernando Camacho, whom he accused of staging the "coup" to oust him, not to "mistreat" Bolivians and "stop kicking" them.

"We don't want confrontations," he added, saying that he was resigning to foster the "pacification" of Bolivia and so that the country could "return to social peace."

The country has been going through a serious crisis since the Oct. 20 election, in which Morales was proclaimed the victor in the presidential race but the opposition claimed that fraud was committed to keep him in power and called for him to resign.

"The struggle doesn't end here," Morales warned, his voice faltering at times, going on to insist in his resignation video that a "civic, political and police coup" had been instigated against him by "oligarchic groups that are conspiring against democracy."

On that subject, he demanded that "the truth be told" to the international community about the so-called coup.

He also said that he was saddened by the violence in recent days, adding that he will be in the Cochabamba area, the portion of Bolivia in which he began his political career, after a series of rumors that he had - or would - leave the country.

"I have no reason to leave," Morales declared, "because I haven't stolen anything."

He said that "My sin is to be indigenous, a union leader, a coca-grower," adding that he was ending his tenure in power after "13 years, nine months and 18 days."

"Many thanks for accompanying us," he concluded in his video address, appearing together with Garcia Linera with a Bolivian flag in the background.

Opposition candidate and former President Carlos Mesa, meanwhile, hailed on Twitter what he called "the end of the tyranny."

"To Bolivia, to her people, to the young people, to the women, to the heroism of the peaceful resistance. I will never forget this unique day. The end of the tyranny. Grateful as a Bolivia for this historic lesson. Long live Bolivia!!!!" Mesa tweeted.

Earlier on Sunday, the armed forces and National Police had called on Morales to resign as a step toward restoring calm in Bolivia, which has been rocked by protests since last month's disputed presidential election.

Armed forces chief Gen. Williams Kaliman and National Police commander Yuri Calderon read separate statements expressing the security forces' position.

Calderon asked Morales to step down in the statement he read.

Earlier in the day, Morales said a new presidential election would take place in Bolivia and the results of the vote held last month would be annulled.

"I have decided to call new elections," Morales said during a brief appearance in the presidential hangar at the international airport in the city of El Alto.

The president was accompanied by representatives of the movements that back his administration and said they were consulted before the decision regarding new elections was made.

Morales's announcement came after the Organization of American States (OAS) released a report recommending that a new presidential election be held due to the irregularities in the Oct. 20 vote that the president won.

Mesa, for his part, said Morales should not be a candidate in the election.

"Evo Morales has shattered the constitutional order and should resign," Mesa said during a press conference.

The 66-year-old Mesa said there was "fraud" in last month's election and "President Evo Morales and Vice President Alvaro Garcia Linera ... are not in a position to preside" over a new election "under Article 168 of the constitution."

Opposition civic leader Luis Fernando Camacho on Sunday also called on Morales and all members of Congress to resign.

Camacho said a "transitional government made up of notable" members of society should be created to "call new elections within a period of no longer than 60 days."

In a blow to the president, the powerful Central Obrera Boliviana (COB), the Andean nation's largest labor federation and a Morales ally in recent years, called on the head of state on Sunday to "resign, if necessary," to calm the country.

COB leader Juan Carlos Huarachi said the labor federation supported new elections and "will not be an accomplice to the shedding of blood."

During his appearance at the airport, Morales did not mention the OAS report, but he said a new election commission would be appointed.

The Attorney General's Office, for its part, said it would charge the members of the Supreme Electoral Tribunal in connection with "presumed irregular acts."

The AG's office said in a statement that the "very serious" irregularities found by the OAS could be linked to alleged crimes committed in the "tabulation of the official results" of the presidential election.

Supreme Electoral Tribunal head Maria Eugenia Choque Quispe tendered her resignation, saying it was "irrevocable" and she wanted to deal with "any investigation" into her agency's conduct.

"I am aware of the report of preliminary findings and submit my irrevocable resignation in this context," Choque Quispe said in a letter to Vice President Alvaro Garcia Linera.

The opposition alleged that the Supreme Electoral Tribunal carried out a fraudulent vote count in the first-round presidential election.

Morales said he agreed to replace all the members of the commission, which the opposition and grassroots organizations contend rigged the vote to give the president a fourth consecutive term that would have ended in 2025.

The 60-year-old Morales said Congress would begin the process shortly to name new members to the elections agency.

Morales said the new presidential election, whose date has not been set, would be overseen by "new political actors."

The president said he agreed to hold a new election to "lower all the tension" and "pacify Bolivia."

Pro- and anti-government protesters have been clashing since the day after the election, leaving at least three people dead and 421 others injured, according to figures released by the Ombudsman's Office.

On Sunday, at least three people were wounded when someone opened fire on a highway in the highlands on a caravan of buses carrying miners headed to La Paz to join the protests against Morales, the Ombudsman's Office said. EFE-EPA

Armed forces and police call on Bolivia's Morales to resign

La Paz, Nov 10 (efe-epa).- The armed forces and National Police on Sunday called on President Evo Morales to resign as a step toward restoring calm in Bolivia, which has been rocked by protests since last month's disputed presidential election.

Armed forces chief Gen. Williams Kaliman and National Police commander Yuri Calderon read separate statements expressing the security forces' position.

Calderon asked Morales to step down in the statement he read.

Earlier in the day, Morales said a new presidential election would take place in Bolivia and the results of the vote held last month would be annulled.

"I have decided to call new elections," Morales said during a brief appearance in the presidential hangar at the international airport in the city of El Alto.

The president was accompanied by representatives of the movements that back his administration and said they were consulted before the decision was made.

Morales's announcement came after the Organization of American States (OAS) released a report recommending that a new presidential election be held due to the irregularities in the Oct. 20 vote that the president won.

Opposition candidate and former President Carlos Mesa, for his part, said Morales should not be a candidate in the election.

"Evo Morales has shattered the constitutional order and should resign," Mesa said during a press conference.

The 66-year-old Mesa said there was "fraud" in last month's election and "President Evo Morales and Vice President Alvaro Garcia Linera ... are not in a position to preside" over a new election "under Article 168 of the constitution."

Opposition civic leader Luis Fernando Camacho on Sunday also called on Morales and all members of Congress to resign.

Camacho said a "transitional government made up of notable" members of society should be created to "call new elections within a period of no longer than 60 days."

In a blow to the president, the powerful Central Obrera Boliviana (COB), the Andean nation's largest labor federation and a Morales ally in recent years, called on the head of state on Sunday to "resign, if necessary," to calm the country.

COB leader Juan Carlos Huarachi said the labor federation supported new elections and "will not be an accomplice to the shedding of blood."

During his appearance at the airport, Morales did not mention the OAS report, but he said a new election commission would be appointed.

The Attorney General's Office, for its part, said it would charge the members of the Supreme Electoral Tribunal in connection with "presumed irregular acts."

The AG's office said in a statement that the "very serious" irregularities found by the OAS could be linked to alleged crimes committed in the "tabulation of the official results" of the presidential election.

Supreme Electoral Tribunal head Maria Eugenia Choque Quispe tendered her resignation, saying it was "irrevocable" and she wanted to deal with "any investigation" into her agency's conduct.

"I am aware of the report of preliminary findings and submit my irrevocable resignation in this context," Choque Quispe said in a letter to Vice President Alvaro Garcia Linera.

The opposition alleged that the Supreme Electoral Tribunal carried out a fraudulent vote count in the first-round presidential election.

Morales said he agreed to replace all the members of the commission, which the opposition and grassroots organizations contend rigged the vote to give the president a fourth consecutive term that would have ended in 2025.

The 60-year-old Morales said Congress would begin the process shortly to name new members to the elections agency.

Morales said the new presidential election, whose date has not been set, would be overseen by "new political actors."

The president said he agreed to hold a new election to "lower all the tension" and "pacify Bolivia."

Pro- and anti-government protesters have been clashing since the day after the election, leaving at least three people dead and 421 others injured, according to figures released by the Ombudsman's Office.

On Sunday, at least three people were wounded when someone opened fire on a highway in the highlands on a caravan of buses carrying miners headed to La Paz to join the protests against Morales, the Ombudsman's Office said.

Several people traveling in the caravan confirmed the attack on social media.

Images posted on social media by caravan members showed miners helping one of the three people wounded in the attack near Challapata, a city in the Andean region of Oruro.

The Ombudsman's Office said it received a complaint from the Potosi Civic Committee about the attack on the miners, who are from the western region of Potosi.

The army responded to the attack by saying it would launched operations targeting illegal armed groups that were harassing the caravans carrying protesters opposed to Morales.

The operations will target groups that are "outside the law," armed forces spokesman Yul Bleisner told reporters in La Paz.

The OAS said in a report released on Sunday that Bolivia should hold the "first round" of the presidential election as soon as conditions allow and name new members to the elections agency.

On Sunday, Mining Minister Cesar Navarro became the first member of Morales's Cabinet to resign.

Navarro submitted his resignation to the president after a mob torched his house in the Andean city of Potosi.

"I have submitted my resignation because I believe that this is a painful time, so I have presented my irrevocable resignation as a minister of state," Navarro told the private PAT channel in a telephone interview.

Navarro said he was sorry about the "very strong" violence in Potosi, telling PAT that the mob burned his house and beat his nephew, and another group is trying to get into his mother's house.

Hydrocarbons Minister Luis Alberto Sanchez and Chamber of Deputies Victor Borda, a member of the governing MAS party, also resigned.

Initially, Morales, a leftist, responded by saying the fraud allegations were part of a coup attempt by Bolivia's right, while Mesa contended the election was marred by fraud and the OAS should audit the vote count.

Morales, the first indigenous president of this majority indigenous Andean nation, acknowledged that the vote tally was closer on this occasion than in his three earlier election victories in 2005, 2009 and 2014, when his margin of victory always exceeded 20 percentage points and was as high as 37 percentage points on two occasions, saying "some mistakes" made over 13 years in power may have cost him votes.

The mere participation in this year's election by Morales - who nationalized the energy sector in May 2006, four months after first taking office, and enacted a new constitution in 2009 that "refounded" Bolivia to the advantage of the Andean nation's downtrodden Indian majority - was seen as illegitimate by the opposition.

Morales secured a third term in office in 2014 after winning a Constitutional Court decision a year earlier.

That tribunal had ruled that because his initial term began three years prior to the enactment of the new constitution it did not count toward term limits restricting presidents to two five-year periods in office.

It then appeared Morales would be barred from running for yet another term this year after voters narrowly rejected his plans to do so in a 2016 referendum, but the Constitutional Court in late 2017 abolished term limits for all elected officials on the grounds that they violate candidates' human rights. EFE-EPA

lar/hv

Morales says new presidential election to be held in Bolivia

La Paz, Nov 10 (efe-epa).- President Evo Morales said Sunday that a new presidential election would take place in Bolivia and the results of the vote held last month would be annulled.

"I have decided to call new elections," Morales said during a press conference in the presidential hangar at the international airport in the city of El Alto.

The president was accompanied during the press conference by representatives of the movements that back his administration and said they were consulted before the decision was made.

Morales's announcement came after the Organization of American States (OAS) released a report recommending that a new presidential election be held due to the irregularities in the Oct. 20 vote that the president won.

During his brief appearance at the airport, Morales did not mention the OAS report, but he said a new election commission would be appointed.

The opposition alleged that the Supreme Electoral Tribunal carried out a fraudulent vote count in the first-round presidential election.

Morales said he agreed to replace all the members of the commission, which the opposition and grassroots organizations contend rigged the vote to give the president a fourth consecutive term that would have ended in 2025.

The 60-year-old Morales said Congress would begin the process shortly to name new members to the elections agency.

Morales said the new presidential election, whose date has not been set, would be overseen by "new political actors."

The president said he agreed to hold a new election to "lower all the tension" and "pacify Bolivia."

Pro- and anti-government protesters have been clashing since the day after the election, leaving at least three people dead and 384 others injured, according to figures released by the Ombudsman's Office.

On Sunday, at least three people were wounded when someone opened fire on a highway in the highlands on a caravan of buses carrying miners headed to La Paz to join the protests against Morales, the Ombudsman's Office said.

Several people traveling in the caravan confirmed the attack on social media.

Images posted on social media by caravan members showed miners helping one of the three people wounded in the attack near Challapata, a city in the Andean region of Oruro.

The Ombudsman's Office said it received a complaint from the Potosi Civic Committee about the attack on the miners, who are from the western region of Potosi.

The OAS said in a report released on Sunday that Bolivia should hold the "first round" of the presidential election as soon as conditions allow and name new members to the elections agency.

Initially, Morales, a leftist, responded by saying the fraud allegations were part of a coup attempt by Bolivia's right, while leading opposition candidate Carlos Mesa contended the election was marred by fraud and the OAS should audit the vote count.

Morales, the first indigenous president of this majority indigenous Andean nation, acknowledged that the vote tally was closer on this occasion than in his three earlier election victories in 2005, 2009 and 2014, when his margin of victory always exceeded 20 percentage points and was as high as 37 percentage points on two occasions, saying "some mistakes" made over 13 years in power may have cost him votes.

The mere participation in this year's election by Morales - who nationalized the energy sector in May 2006, four months after first taking office, and enacted a new constitution in 2009 that "refounded" Bolivia to the advantage of the Andean nation's downtrodden Indian majority - was seen as illegitimate by the opposition.

Morales secured a third term in office in 2014 after winning a Constitutional Court decision a year earlier.

That tribunal had ruled that because his initial term began three years prior to the enactment of the new constitution it did not count toward term limits restricting presidents to two five-year periods in office.

It then appeared Morales would be barred from running for yet another term this year after voters narrowly rejected his plans to do so in a 2016 referendum, but the Constitutional Court in late 2017 abolished term limits for all elected officials on the grounds that they violate candidates' human rights. EFE-EPA

lar/hv

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Bangkok Desk, Nov 12 (efe-epa).- The crisis in Bolivia following the resignation of President Evo Morales after almost 14 years in office have divided the...

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