15 de noviembre de 2019
ÚLTIMAS NOTICIAS:
Hispanic World

UN Security Council visits Colombia at troubled moment for peace process

Bogota, Jul 11 (efe-epa).-The United Nations Security Council is visiting Colombia at a critical moment for the implementation of the 2016 peace agreement, a process now complicated by the killings of at least 140 former FARC members and a Supreme Court order for the arrest of an ex-guerrilla leader.

 The president of the United Nations Security Council, Peruvian Ambassador Gustavo Meza-Cuadra. EPA-EFE/Alba Vigaray/File

The president of the United Nations Security Council, Peruvian Ambassador Gustavo Meza-Cuadra. EPA-EFE/Alba Vigaray/File

Bogota, Jul 11 (efe-epa).-The United Nations Security Council is visiting Colombia at a critical moment for the implementation of the 2016 peace agreement, a process now complicated by the killings of at least 140 former FARC members and a Supreme Court order for the arrest of an ex-guerrilla leader.

Representatives of the 15 Security Council member states and officials from the UN General Secretariat are scheduled to arrive in Bogota on Thursday night and return to New York on Sunday morning.

The first item on their agenda will be a private meeting on Friday with conservative Colombian President Ivan Duque, whose foreign minister, Carlos Holmes Trujillo, extended the invitation to the Council in April.

Once that meeting concludes, Duque and the Council's president, Peruvian Ambassador Gustavo Meza-Cuadra, will give a press conference.

The delegation from that multilateral organization also will meet on Friday with members of civil society, the United Nations System and the Common Alternative Revolutionary Force (FARC), a communist political party that is the successor to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia guerrilla group and uses the same acronym.

They also will hold meetings with representatives of government agencies and the Special Jurisdiction for Peace (JEP), which was established as part of the Nov. 24, 2016, peace deal between former President Juan Manuel Santos' administration and the FARC and tasked with investigating and adjudicating crimes committed during Colombia's decades-old armed conflict.

On Saturday, the delegation will visit one of the Territorial Training and Reincorporation Spaces (ETCRs) and speak with former guerrilla fighters who are being reintegrated into society after laying down their weapons.

The goal of the visit - promoted by the Peruvian and British ambassadors to the Council following Trujillo's invitation - is to support efforts to implement the peace accord.

The delegation also intends to "observe and support the United Nations' peace mission in Colombia and better understand the priorities and concerns of the parties to the peace agreement and other stakeholders in the process," Meza-Cuadra said on June 26.

The visit to Colombia, however, comes at a complicated moment for the peace accord, with the FARC saying on Thursday that at least 140 ex-guerrillas and 31 of their relatives have been killed since it was signed.

The former guerrilla group says those crimes constitute a clear violation of the agreement and has demanded international assistance to ensure its candidates can participate in the Oct. 27 municipal and regional elections with security guarantees.

The FARC has harshly criticized Duque's administration and blames it for not providing protection for ex-combatants that laid down their weapons as part of the peace deal.

The spate of killings has revived memories of the Union Patriotica, a party founded in 1985 as the FARC rebels were engaged in peace talks with the government and exploring the idea of abandoning armed struggle in favor of electoral politics.

The UP fared respectably at the polls in 1986, provoking a campaign of terror by paramilitaries and some elements of the security forces that resulted in the deaths of nearly 4,000 party members and the destruction of Union Patriotica as a political force.

Members of another insurgency that laid down their arms, M-19, met a similar fate in the 1990s.

At least seven former FARC leaders, meanwhile, have turned their backs on the 2016 peace agreement, the most recent case being that of Jesus Santrich, who was served an arrest warrant after he failed to show up in court on Tuesday in a drug-smuggling case.

Santrich's whereabouts is unknown since June 29, when he apparently eluded the bodyguards assigned to him by the national protection unit during a visit to an ETCR in the northern province of Cesar.

Santrich, a former FARC commander wanted in the US on drug-trafficking charges, spent a total of 416 days behind bars before a May 30 Supreme Court ruling that he was entitled to certain protections because a seat in Congress had been reserved for him under the terms of the 2016 peace deal.

He was sworn-in last month as a member of the Colombian House of Representatives. The peace accord set aside 10 seats in Congress - five each in the Senate and House - for people to be designated by the new FARC party.

Despite these problems, the government expressed optimism about the Security Council visit.

"The government of President Ivan Duque welcomes the visit by the Security Council with great satisfaction and believes it will offer another chance for its members to learn first-hand about the progress" made over the past 11 months, Trujillo said.

Duque's administration expects that the Security Council's assessments will be included in a report on the peace process that the UN Verification Mission in Colombia will present on July 19 in New York. EFE-EPA

Histórico de noticias
Hyundai to expand Alabama plant to turn out new pickup

Washington, Now 14 (efe-epa).- Hyundai will invest $410 million to expand its assembly plant in Montgomery, Alabama, where it will turn out a new vehicle,...

Google to lay 620 mi. of marine cable to Panama, to be operational in 1 year

Panama City, Nov 14 (efe-epa).- Google announced on Thursday that it will lay a 1,000-kilometer (620-mile) stretch of undersea fiber-optic cable to Panama,...

Latin music figures join before Latin Grammys to fundraise for Parkinsons

Las Vegas, Nov 14 (efe-epa).- Figures from the Ibero-American music industry like Luis Fonsi and Ximena Sariñana gathered on the eve of the Latin Grammy...

Goya comes to Havana along with Spanish monarchs

Havana, Nov 14 (efe-epa).- One of Francisco de Goya's iconic self-portraits is coming to Havana along with Spain's King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia, who on...

Trump's greatest interest in Ukraine was to investigate Biden, says diplomat

(Updates: Adds info on Taylor and Kent's testimony, Trump's remarks on hearings and other material)

New Disney+ platform hits 10 mn subscribers in one day

New York, Nov 13 (efe-epa).- The new streaming platform Disney+ managed to garner 10 million subscribers in the single day since its Nov. 12 launching in...

Spanish royals visit site where Havana was founded 500 years ag

By Carlos Perez Gil

Trump: Trade pact with China close, but more tariffs if no deal

New York, Nov 12 (efe-epa).- The United States and China are "close" to the first phase of an agreement to resolve their trade war, President Donald Trump...

Trump: Many Dreamers are not angels, but criminals

by Laura Barros

Uncertainty reigns in Bolivia after Morales flees to Mexico

Bangkok Desk, Nov 12 (efe-epa).- The crisis in Bolivia following the resignation of President Evo Morales after almost 14 years in office have divided the...

Bolivia crisis: Coup d'etat or power vacuum?

By Laura Núñez Marín

1,000 women breastfeed their children in Rio to defend the practice

Rio de Janeiro, Nov 11 (efe-epa).- About 1,000 women on Monday breastfed their children simultaneously during an event held in Rio de Janeiro to raise...

Trump pays tribute to veterans at 100th anniversary of NY parade

New York, Nov 11 (efe-epa).- President Donald Trump on Monday paid tribute to all US veterans - currently numbering some 18 million - in an emotional...

Colombian artist sculpts monument long-distance, then 3D prints it

Bogota, Nov 10 (efe-epa).- Colombian artist Joaquin Restrepo is the sculptor of a monumental statue that was sculpted long-distance and then 3D printed.

Saving the Amazon, or at least trying: A tough job for taricaya turtles

By Alvaro Mellizo

Protests continue in Bolivia as uncertainty looms after Morales resigns

By Laura Nuneez Marín

Judge orders Trump to personally pay $2 mm for violating charities laws

New York, Nov 7 (efe-epa).- A New York state judge on Thursday ordered President Donald Trump to personally pay $2 million for persistently violating state...

Japanese robot, new companion for Uruguayan kids being treated for cancer

Montevideo, Nov 7 (efe-epa).- Children suffering from cancer and being treated at the Perez Scremini Foundation in Montevideo will have a new companion, a...

Colombian defense minister resigns amid scandal over massacre of 8 minors

Bogota, Nov 6 (efe-epa).- Colombian Defense Minister Guillermo Botero on Wednesday presented his resignation after the day before it became known that he...

Ewan McGregor: I feel no responsibility to fans of "The Shining"

By David Villafranca

Study: Deforestation in Brazil's Amazon jumped by 80 pct. in September

Sao Paulo, Nov 6 (efe-epa).- Deforestation in Brazil's Amazon region increased by 80 percent in September compared to the same month last year, according to...

John Leguizamo "Playing with Fire" for US Latino kids

By Alicia Civita

Trump conditioned Ukraine aid on Biden case, US envoy to EU admits

Washington, Nov 5 (efe-epa).- The US ambassador to the European Union, Gordon Sondland, on Tuesday in an amendment to his earlier congressional testimony...

Santiago's Plaza Italia: Ground Zero for Chile's social earthquake

By Alberto Peña